Resources



PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Literature Review on Individuals with Neurologic or Neurodevelopment Conditions and Risk of Serious Influenza-Related Complications

Literature Review on Individuals with Neurologic or Neurodevelopment Conditions and Risk of Serious Influenza-Related Complications

An Advisory Committee Review: National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI). The findings of the present rapid literature review are consistent with the preliminary evidence supporting children and adults with neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions as groups at risk for influenza-related complications and hospitalization.

Corporate Authors: National Advisory Committee on Immunization
Publisher: Public Health Agency of Canada


PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Les fournisseurs de soins TYPE: External Link L’immunisation de l’enfant immunodéprimé : les principes fondamentaux

L’immunisation de l’enfant immunodéprimé : les principes fondamentaux

Pour assurer l’immunisation des enfants immunodéprimés, il faut adopter des stratégies de vaccination visant à maximiser la protection tout en minimisant les méfaits. Les dispensateurs de soins de première ligne et les spécialistes qui s’occupent de ces enfants partagent la responsabilité de la vaccination. Des lignes directrices détaillées figurent dans la version à jour du Guide canadien d’immunisation, mais les principes généraux sont exposés dans le Point de pratique publié par la Société canadienne de pédiatrie.

Corporate Authors: Comité des maladies infectieuses et d'immunisation
Publisher: Société canadienne de pédiatrie

PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Les fournisseurs de soins TYPE: External Link Mise à jour sur la vaccination contre la méningococcie invasive chez les enfants et les adolescents canadiens

Mise à jour sur la vaccination contre la méningococcie invasive chez les enfants et les adolescents canadiens

Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is serious, often resulting in fulminant sepsis or meningitis. IMD in Canada is primarily attributable to serogroups B and C. There are routine programs for serogroup C vaccine at 12 months of age, with some jurisdictions routinely providing additional earlier doses. Adolescents routinely receive a booster dose of serogroup C vaccine or of a quadrivalent (serogroups A, C, W and Y) vaccine. Serogroup B vaccines are not recommended for routine use pending further data on the efficacy and duration of protection from the available vaccine. However, children at increased risk for IMD should start immunization for serogroups B and C as soon as possible, assuming that they are at least 2 months of age.

Authors: Robinson JL
Journal Issue: 1
Journal Title: Paediatrics & Child Health
Journal Volume: 23
Publisher: Oxford Academic


PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link NACI Literature Review on the Comparative Effectiveness and Immunogenicity of Subunit and Split Virus Inactivated Influenza Vaccines in Adults 65 Years of Age and Older

NACI Literature Review on the Comparative Effectiveness and Immunogenicity of Subunit and Split Virus Inactivated Influenza Vaccines in Adults 65 Years of Age and Older

Subunit and split virus inactivated influenza vaccines are two commonly used types of seasonal influenza vaccines, and continue to dominate the market in Canada. Although these two formulations of influenza vaccine have been available for many decades, NACI has not previously conducted a literature review to investigate the comparative vaccine effectiveness of these different formulations. A difference in vaccine effectiveness between these formulations would be especially important for older adults (65 years of age or older), since there is evidence that older adults experience more severe illness due to influenza and have reduced vaccine effectiveness compared to younger adults. To address this gap, NACI conducted a literature review to examine the vaccine effectiveness and immunogenicity of unadjuvanted, standard dose subunit inactivated influenza vaccines compared to unadjuvanted, standard dose split virus inactivated influenza  vaccines in adults 65 years of age and older.

Corporate Authors: National Advisory Committee on Immunization
Publisher: Public Health Agency of Canada

PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Health care providers, Parents, Pregnant women TYPE: PDFPertussis. Contagious. Preventable.

Pertussis. Contagious. Preventable.

Poster: Immunization against pertussis during pregnancy is safe and helps reduce the risk of disease in infants.

Corporate Authors: Immunize Canada

PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Potential strategies to improve childhood immunization rates in Canada: CPS Position Statement

Potential strategies to improve childhood immunization rates in Canada: CPS Position Statement

Immunization rates in Canada are suboptimal. Strategies such as making immunization mandatory for child care or school entry and financial incentives are used in other countries. Additional strategies that could work in the Canadian context include requiring accurate immunization records at school entry, implementing immunization registries at the provincial/territorial level, educating parents and school-aged children about vaccine-preventable diseases and making it more convenient for parents to ensure their children are fully immunized.

Authors: Robinson JL
Corporate Authors: Infectious Diseases and Immunization Committee
Publisher: Canadian Paediatric Society

PUBLISHED: 2018 CATEGORY: Health care providers TYPE: External Link Q & A on Tdap Vaccination Against Pertussis (Whooping Cough) During Pregnancy in Canada

Q & A on Tdap Vaccination Against Pertussis (Whooping Cough) During Pregnancy in Canada

This document answers frequently asked questions health care providers may have when offering or administering the Tdap vaccine  to pregnant women.
Authors: Castillo, E et al.
Corporate Authors: Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada
Publisher: Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada